Coronado Heights Park

Coronado Heights Castle
The castle at Coronado Heights is a local landmark.
All photos on this page by Jim Mason.

The castle at Coronado Heights was constructed by the Works Progress Administration in 1932. They also built the stone picnic sites, restroom, and stone front gate at the park.

Coronado Heights is a prominent, isolated hill overlooking the Smoky Hill river valley.  It is the last of a row of erosional hills extending to the north which are capped by the sandstone of the Dakota Formation.  It is 300 feet above the surrounding valley floor, offering sweeping vistas of the surrounding countryside.  The eroded face of Coronado Heights reveals a panorama of geological history as well, covering 230 million years of time.  At its base are gray and red shales that made up the floor of an ancient salt water sea. At the top is the Dakota Sandstone, a mixture of marine, fresh water and subtropical fossil material.

Coronado Heights has mixed prairie with numerous wildflowers.  Yucca, spiderwort and butterfly milkweed are just a few of the species that may be seen there.  A forested area nestles around the north and east sides of the hill.  Clumps of sandhill plum, gooseberry and sumac may be found.  The park is contiguous with a large native prairie pasture extending to the north and northwest.

Mixed prairie vista at Coronado Heights
View looking northwest from the top

 

Coronado Heights has mixed prairie with numerous wildflowers.  Yucca, spiderwort and butterfly milkweed are just a few of the species that may be seen there.  A forested area nestles around the north and east sides of the hill.  Clumps of sandhill plum, gooseberry and sumac may be found.  The park is contiguous with a large native prairie pasture extending to the north and northwest.

The Smoky Valley Historical Association (SVHA) parent organization obtained the land for a park in 1919 from two pioneer Swedish farm families. The SVHA built the walking trail and auto road to the top along with a shelter house and flag stand in the early 1920's.  The park was deeded to Saline County in 1936 for management after the WPA work and reverted back to the SVHA in 1988.  It has been managed by them since that time.  In 1988 a special monument for Coronado was designed and built by Lindsborg artist John Whitfield and the Smoky Valley Historical Association and volunteers.

bullet Stone shelter building with observation deck, picnic sites, pit toilet.

Camping iconCamping not allowed

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Trail iconA 3 mile mountain bicycle trail winds around the hill.

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Map of Coronado Heights Park

Directions: From Lindsborg (18 miles S of Salina), follow K-4 to the west edge of town.  Take Coronado Avenue 3 miles north to Winchester Road and go 1 mile west. Open 8 AM to 11 PM.

Location in Kansas

For a Google Map of the site,
click here.

Ownership: The entity which owns Coronado Heights is the Smoky Valley Historical Association.  If you have specific questions about use or management of this site, contact the Lindsborg Chamber of Commerce at (785) 227-3706.

16 1/2 acres.

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